Corn Snake

Corn Snake will be discussed today. The design of their body is what makes them famous. They’re also popular because of the variety of colors available. The most incredible thing about these creatures is that they may be tamed or wild. They are simple to look after. There are, however, a few points to keep in mind.

Introduction

  • They are a sort of rat snake with a pattern on their belly scales that mimics maize, a forerunner of today’s corn.
  • They’re recognized for being adept climbers and escape artists, and their diversity of colors and patterns, as well as their typically even temperament, make them popular pets.
  • They may be placid, gentle companions with frequent handling.
  • It is also known as red rat snakes, which are slender, orange, or brownish-yellow snakes with a pattern of huge red spots on their backs that are bordered in black.
  • Rows of alternating black and white markings, like a checkerboard pattern, run over their bellies.

Scientific Name

Pantherophis guttatus is the scientific name of this breed. 

Features

Size 

  • They reach a length of 61–182 cm (2.00–5.97 ft.) as adults.
  • They normally live for six to eight years in the wild, but in captivity, they can survive for up to 23 years.
  • The oldest snake kept in captivity was 32 years and 3 months old.

Color

  • They have a pattern of big, red spots highlighted in black along their backs and are slender, orange, or brownish-yellow snakes.
  • They are native to the eastern United States, although Florida and the southeastern United States have most of them.

Read also: Gaboon Viper: Facts, diet, habitat, and food 

Have a look at the Corn Snake Morphs Color Chart

There are currently 830 known variants of these snakes, which were among the first snakes bred in captivity for color variety. Some of these morphs are mutations that happen spontaneously. Lavender, snow, and black are the most widely used colors.

  • Amelanistic: Low contrast red with yellows and oranges.
  • Black: A deep gray with black blotches that are bordered by black.
  • Blood Red: A vivid red color with a white belly and subtle or no patterning.
  • Blue: Bluish-gray with spots of deeper gray.
  • Crimson: Snakes with striking crimson coloration and high color contrast.
  • Florida: Base color of tan-orange with reddish-orange spots.

Know them, know their behavior

Feeding Habits

  • Rodents and other small mammals make up the majority of an adult snake’s diet, but birds and their eggs are also included.
  • The juvenile will consume rodents, frogs, lizards, and other small snakes.

What They Eat?…Know their food and diet

  • They eat rodents mostly. They are constrictor snakes, which means they capture and crush their prey.
  • You may want to give your snake the impression that it is catching its food, even if you are feeding it dead rodents.

Lifespan

  • They can survive about 15 years.
  • In the wild, they have a life expectancy of about 6-8 years. They are frequently sexually active far into their adolescence. 

Habitat Size

Habitat Size of Corn Snake
Habitat Size of Corn Snake
  • A terrarium of at least 40 gallons is required for an adult.
  • A sturdy, lockable sliding screen lid is required to keep these snakes safe.
  • For the first few months, a juvenile snake should be kept in a 10-gallon tank (or bigger if feasible) since it is an ideal size and shape habitat for a newborn colubrid to support typical activities and exercise.
  • Corn Snakes mature into adults in two to three years. As it grows, you’ll need to expand the size of its habitat.

Habitat And History

  • They are native to North America, where they were originally observed in Native American Indians’ corn hutches, where they would devour mice that came to eat the corn. In the wild today, corn snakes are still well-tolerated because they aid in controlling rodent numbers.
  • The Colubrinae family of large common snakes includes corn snakes. Consequently, they are related to kings, milk, garters, waters, bulls, pines, and racers. 

Heat, Light & Humidity 

  • Temperature gradient (the heated end is 85°F, while the cold end is in the low 70s°F).
  • An over-the-tank basking heat lamp and/or an under-tank heater are advised for radiant heat.
  • At least two thermometers (one in the chilly zone and one in the basking zone) or a point-and-shoot thermometer should be used to check the temperature in the tank regularly.
  • Maintain a humidity level of 40-60%, with a greater level (70%) during shedding.
  • Shedding can be aided with a shallow open bowl of water, a wet paper towel, sphagnum moss, and a daily spray with warm water.
  • Allow for 8-12 hours of light every day.
  • During the day, all snakes benefit from UVA/UVB light exposure to aid boost immune system function and support normal health and behavior.
  • At night, a nocturnal or infrared light should be utilized instead of white light.

Nesting

  • Typically, female corn snakes lay their eggs in the early summer (July) after mating in the spring (April to June).
  • The adult snake does not tend to the eggs. They are placed in decomposing plant heaps, rotting stumps, and other similar places where there is enough heat and moisture to incubate them.
  • In two to three months, the eggs hatched.
  • A lot of young corn snakes eat tiny lizards and frogs until they are big enough to catch bigger prey. Due to predation by a variety of other species, only a few hatchlings make it to adulthood.

Intelligence and Behavior

  • Some popular pet snakes, such as corn snakes, boas, and pythons, have been discovered to be capable of learning and being trained, as well as cooperating socially.
  • A corn snake, python, or boa constrictor may be your best choice if you want a knowledgeable pet snake.
  • They are among the most peaceful and gentle reptiles on the planet.
  • When they are stressed, they do not bite, defecate, or constrict, and they love being handled from time to time.

Reproduction

  • They are oviparous, which means they deposit eggs that hatch after some time.
  • The female snake lays a clutch of 10 to 30 eggs under rotting stumps, heaps of decaying vegetation, or other similar places with enough heat and humidity to incubate the eggs from late May to July.

Corn Snake Pet

  • The corn snake gets its name from the corn granaries that attracted mice and then these mouse predators.
  • It makes a great pet snake.
  • It’s an excellent choice for new snake owners because it’s typically docile, easy to care for, and doesn’t get very large.

Care

  • Snakes shed their skin regularly; keep the humidity in your habitat at a comfortable level (70 percent during shedding) to allow your corn snake to shed correctly. Snakes should normally lose their skin in one piece.
  • Never attempt to remove eye caps (also known as glasses) on your own. Seek veterinary assistance.
  • Because all reptiles can carry infectious illnesses like salmonella, always wash your hands before and after touching your reptile or the contents of your habitat to help avoid disease transmission.
  • Pregnant women, children under the age of 5, older individuals, and those with compromised immune systems should see their doctor before acquiring or caring for reptiles and might consider having a different type of pet.

Baby Corn Snake

  • Because of their little teeth, baby corn snake bites aren’t particularly painful.
  • In general, don’t feed your corn snake anything bigger than 1.5 times its middle size.
  • Feed frozen pinkies or mice that haven’t grown fur if your corn snake is a hatchling.
  • Feed one to two pinkies every week to your hatchling.

Predator

Foxes, opossums, skunks, bobcats, weasels, and hawks are among the corn snake’s predators.

Small Mammals and Reptiles Affected by this snake 

  • Many small mammals and reptiles are affected by this snake.
  • Squirrels are one such mammal that is eaten by a Corn snake. However, reptiles like lizards, frogs, and small snakes are also affected by this snake.

Albino Corn Snake

  • It is a popular medium-sized snake that comes in many different morphs and colors.
  • They are also known as melanistic because they lack melanin or black pigment.
  • These snakes come in a variety of colors, including brilliant red, orange, yellow, and white.
  • Red, orange, or pink eyes are also common. Corn snakes captured in South Carolina were used to create the Okeetee corn snake.

Corn Snake For Sale

  • They may be found at pet stores, reptile expos, internet reptile stores, and through breeders.
  • It cost roughly $50 on average.
  • That price reduces to around $25 to $30 for a standard morph corn snake.
  • The most fascinating morphs cost a little more, approximately $40 or $50, with some of the most popular morphs costing up to $80.

Common Health Issues

Corn snakes, like any other animal, can become ill. Because they are sensitive to a variety of illnesses, keeping their surroundings clean is essential for their health. Some of the common health issues are: 

  • Dermatitis
  • Respiratory Disease
  • Stomatitis
  • Lumps or bumps in the skin
  • Ticks or mites

Housing Your Corn Snake

  • They require hiding places to feel secure.
  • Provide a hide box (any closed-in container, such as an upside-down cardboard box) just big enough for the snake to curl up in; if it’s too big, the snake won’t feel as safe.

Similar Species to the Corn Snakes

They are many more species of snakes. Some of the snakes which are related to this species are:

Interesting Facts

  • They are frequently killed because they are mistaken for the deadly copperhead. Corn snakes, like copperheads, are helpful rodent predators who provide crucial food for a variety of other creatures.
  • The Corn Snake, commonly known as the red rat snake, is one of numerous rat snake species found in North America. Rat snakes are huge, strong, nonvenomous snakes that feed on a range of prey species that they constrict and overcome.
  • It is primarily nocturnal, hiding during the day under loose tree bark, animal burrows, or abandoned structures.
  • From March through November, the corn snake is most active. During the summer months, when it crosses highways at night, this species is more commonly seen.

Reference Link

Corn Snake-FAQ

How much does a Corn Snake cost?

They cost roughly $50 on average. That price reduces to around $25 to $30 for a standard morph corn snake. The most fascinating morphs cost a little more, approximately $40 or $50, with some of the most popular morphs costing up to $80.

What does a Corn Snake look like?

Corn snakes, also known as red rat snakes, are slender, orange or brownish-yellow snakes with a pattern of huge red spots on their backs that are bordered in black. Rows of alternating black and white markings, like a checkerboard pattern, run over their bellies.

How big does a Corn Snake get?

They reach a length of 61–182 cm (2.00–5.97 ft.) as adults. They normally live for six to eight years in the wild, but in captivity, they can survive for up to 23 years. The world’s oldest corn snake was 32 years and 3 months old.

Is it hard to take care of a corn snake?

It’s an excellent choice for new snake owners because it’s typically docile, easy to care for, and doesn’t get very large. Even experienced keepers like these reptiles because of the wide range of attractive colors and patterns that careful captive breeding has developed.

Are Albino Corn Snakes friendly?

It is a popular medium-sized snake that can be obtained for roughly $40 USD and comes in a range of morphs and color. A wonderful pet for every owner, regardless of their previous experience. Corn snakes are gentle and like being handled once they’ve been tamed and used to captivity.

What do corn snake eat?

Your corn snake should typically eat mice, but you can also give it other prey, including appropriately sized quail or rats. Make sure the prey is completely defrosted and that its width is no more than 1.5 times that of the snake’s widest point.

How big do Corn snakes get?

It can reach lengths of 4-6 feet.

How long do corn Snakes live?

With the right care, corn snakes can survive for more than 20 years.

How long can Corn Snakes go without eating?

Since their metabolism is slow, corn snakes can go for weeks or even months without eating, but when they do, they frequently get sick. Go to the vet if your pet hasn’t eaten in a while.

Where do Corn snakes live?

Although native to the Eastern United States, corn snakes are a common pet due to their even temperament and handling.