Dutch Shepherd

It is a Dutch Shepherd that is easy to train and is very intelligent. They come directly from the Netherlands. They are great for single couples as they do not require much exercise. But, before bringing them home, get some idea about their lifespan, height, and food. We will also tell you about their puppies and prices. 

 Introduction 

  • It is an intelligent, highly trainable jack-of-all-trades that was originally used by shepherds in the Netherlands for all-around farm work.
  • They work as police dogs, service animals, and family-friendly companions in modern times.
  • The ears of this breed are enormous and pointed, and they stand tall on their wedge-shaped skulls. The ears of a Dutch Shepherd puppy will be floppy at first, but as the muscles and cartilage develop, they will perk up.
  • The eyes of this breed are almond-shaped and usually brown or gold.
  • A Dutch Shepherd’s tail should reach the hock. The tail will either have a small curl or hang straight down when the dog is at rest. When the dog is in motion, the tail is gently carried upwards.

Second Name

Dutch Herder and Nederlandse herdershond are the second names of this breed. 

Nickname

Many names were offered based on their personalities, which are listed below:

  • Ruger
  • Max
  • Diesel
  • Dino
  • Rex
  • Franz
  • Bubba
  • Tink
  • Hunter
  • Mack

Read also: Serval Cat-Cute or Dangerous?

History

  • This breed began as a working dog for shepherds. They were employed for a variety of chores on farms around the Netherlands. They could not only herd sheep and other livestock, but they could also keep fowl out of the gardens, pull carts, and function as watchdogs.
  • Other than coat color, there was little to distinguish Dutch Shepherds from German Shepherds or Belgian Shepherds until the last 100 years, when the breeds diverged a little further and developed their breed standards.
  • In recent years, it has become increasingly infrequent. Modern farming practices rendered these dogs obsolete for herding and other farm tasks, and breeding in the Netherlands ceased during World War II. Many dogs died of famine, and some were taken by the German Wehrmacht for use in the armed forces because they were extremely trainable. Breeders continued to breed Dutch Shepherds and mixed in dogs of unknown provenance after the war.
  • Because they are highly trainable, Dutch Shepherds are utilized for police work, search and rescue, and as guide dogs today, even though the breed is still scarce. They also participate in dog sports and have preserved their herding skills from their farm days.

Characteristic

  • Scientific Name: Canis lupus familiaris 
  • Origin: Netherlands
  • Group: Herding Group 
  • Coat: Wirehair, short hair, and long hair 
  • Coat Color: Brindle, gold brindle, silver brindle, salt & pepper, and blue-grey.
  • Height: 22-24 inches
  • Weight: 8-12 pounds
  • Lifespan: 8-15 years
  • Personality: Reliable, affectionate, alert, obedient, loyal, and trainable 

Behavior

Dutch Shepherd are great with family members. Also, they are affectionate and obedient. But before bringing them into your home, know them in every aspect.

Sensitivity

  • They are sensitive, because of their high sensitivity, they can get violent towards strangers.

Kid-Friendly

  • They get along well with family members, including children and other pets, and are affectionate and obedient.
  • However, experts advise against leaving your children alone in the house if you have a dog.

Other Animal

  • Other dogs and pets are usually acceptable with Dutch Shepherds.
  • Early socialization training can help.
  • They maintain their genuine friendliness while also ensuring that they remain calm around new people and animals.

Care They Need

As with all dogs, you should take your Dutch Shepherd to the veterinarian regularly, keep an eye on their food, and exercise so that they remain healthy. Therefore, given below are some points which will help you in taking care of them:

Food & Diet

  • However, because Dutch Shepherds are prone to gaining weight, their food should include biologically adequate proteins, healthy fats, ground bones, and vegetables – which are high in critical vitamins and minerals – for optimum health and performance.

Read also: Lhasa apso- Know Height, lifespan and price 

Exercise

You must keep up with your Dutch Shepherd’s daily activity requirements.

  • They’ll require at least one nice, long walk every day, as well as some lively playtime.
  • They may grow bored, anxious, and destructive if they are not mentally and physically active.

Training

While they are less common than other shepherd breeds, they are regarded as being healthy and easy to teach.

  • Early socialization training is crucial for them to remain calm around new people and animals.
  • Basic instructions such as sit, stay, down, and go should be taught to them. 

Grooming

These dogs come in three coat lengths, with the length of the coat dictating the amount of maintenance required.

  • Brushing shorter coats simply once a week is sufficient, however brushing long fur three times a week or more is necessary, especially during the shedding seasons of spring and fall.
  • Brushing your pet’s teeth twice a day is recommended. 
  • Check their nails regularly. If they hit the ground trim them. 

Health Problems

In general, Dutch Shepherds are a relatively healthy breed. There are isolated cases of hip dysplasia in Dutch Shepherds, however, they are far less common than in related breeds like German Shepherds. 

  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Masticatory Myositis
  • Pannus
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Goniodysplasia 

Dutch Shepherd Mix

  • Shepherd Pit
  • Dutchie Husky
  • Dutch Lab
  • Dutch Shepherd German Shepherd
  • Mali Dutchie

Speed

  • They are a fun-loving breed that thrives in the great outdoors and has remarkable stamina.
  • They can run at rates of up to 37 mph because of their muscular physique.
  • They were historically used to guard Dalmatia’s borders, therefore they had to be extremely attentive and quick.

To Buy/Adopt

  • We recommend adopting rather than buying if you want to keep this puppy as a pet.
  • Adoption benefits both of you because it gives the homeless dog home while also keeping you company. 

Dutch shepherd Puppy

  • The number of puppies in a litter can range from 6 to 10.

Dutch Shepherd for Sale

  • A puppy from a Dutch Shepherd should cost at least $1,200.
  • And even more for breeding rights or competition-quality pups, which may cost upwards of $7,000 in some cases.

Malinois Dutch Shepherd

  • The Mali-dutchie is a cross between the Belgian Malinois and the Dutch Shepherd dog breeds. Herding dogs are the ancestors of this huge breed.
  • It is a lovely mix of both the Malinois and the Dutch Shepherd.
  • While their appearance can vary significantly even within the same litter, the Mali-dutchie is a wonderful mixture of both the Malinois and the Dutch Shepherd.

Overview

  • As you might expect, the Dutch Shepherd began its life as a shepherd’s working dog.
  • They were utilized for a variety of duties on farms throughout the Netherlands.
  • They could not only herd sheep and other livestock, but they could also keep fowl out of the gardens, pull carts, and function as watchdogs.

Read also: Samoyed-Height, Lifespan and Puppies for sale 

Good & Bad About Them

Good

  • They are highly intelligent and are easily trainable.
  • They are excellent family dogs. 
  • This is not a dog that will start fights out of the blue or bark at every new person or animal it meets.

Bad

  • If they aren’t properly trained, they can become overprotective.
  • It is suspicious of persons it has never met before. If their attempts at deterrence are ineffective, their very strong sense of territory can lead them to become hostile.

Fun Facts

  • Although the precise year this breed was created is uncertain, there is proof that they have been in the Netherlands since the early nineteenth century.
  • even though the breed’s popularity has grown, the Dutch Shepherd is still an uncommon breed. Measures are still being taken to improve the situation for the Dutch Shepherd and expand their numbers.
  • Although this breed was bred to work on farms, its intelligence, and other characteristics made them ideal for a variety of other jobs. They are now most usually connected with assisting law enforcement. The Royal Dutch Police Dog Association has been training Dutch Shepherds since 1907.
  • It is a smart, easy-to-train dog that is also quite nimble. This makes them an ideal breed for competing in a variety of dog sports. Dog agility, flyball, dock jumping, obedience, tracking, weight pulling, nose work, rally obedience, disc dog, and Schutzhund are some of the activities in which the Dutch Shepherd participates. 

Reference Link

Dutch Shepherd-FAQ

What is a Dutch Shepherd?

They get along well with family members, including children and other pets, and are affectionate and obedient.

How much is a Dutch Shepherd?

The cost of a Dutch Shepherd puppy should be at least $1,200. And even more for breeding rights or competition-quality pups, which may cost upwards of $7,000 in some cases.

What does a Dutch Shepherd look like?

They should always be a brindle color, with a silver or golden base (ranging from a light sand to a chestnut red color) and either a dark brown or black-colored brindle that covers the dog’s entire body.

How fast can a Dutch Shepherd run?

They are a fun-loving breed that thrives in the great outdoors and has remarkable stamina. They can run at rates of up to 37 mph because to their muscular body. They were historically used to guard Dalmatia’s borders, therefore they had to be extremely attentive and quick.

Should I use toothpaste for my dog? 

You should not use your toothpaste for your dog. Ingredients in toothpaste for humans should not be consumed. It might produce an upset stomach or digestive problems if consumed. Some human toothpastes have high salt levels, which might make your pet sick, while others have xylitol, which is poisonous to dogs.