Goliath Birdeater

This is the largest spider in the world. This is Goliath Birdeater. Lizards and spiders attract the curiosity of certain people. As a result, they have domesticated them. However, domesticating this creature as a pet is not simple. So, before getting one as a pet, learn as much as you can about them.

Description

  • In South American forests, the Goliath Birdeater spider is a stealth hunter.
  • The king of spiders is the Goliath Birdeater. This tarantula, which can weigh up to six ounces and has a limb span of about a foot, is the world’s biggest spider.
  • It is found in northern South America’s highland rainforest areas, including Suriname, Guyana, French Guiana, northern Brazil, and southern Venezuela.
  • The spider, which is most evident in the Amazon rainforest, is a terrestrial creature that lives in deep tunnels and is usually found in marshy or swampy environments.
  • The proper individual can have a Goliath Birdeater as a pet, although it is not suggested for beginners.
  • Because this spider’s greatest size is so vast, it requires a significantly larger environment and has longer fangs than other tarantula species. If you’re thinking of getting this species as a pet, do your study first!

Scientific Name

Theraphosa blondi

Feature

  • The hue ranges from russet brown to black, and the third and fourth pairs of legs have unique spines.
  • Because the tarantula’s fangs fold under its body, it must hit its victim downwards to entangle it.

Size

  • The body may be as long as 4.75 inches (12 cm) and the leg span can be as long as 11 inches (28 centimeters).
  • The Goliath bird-eating tarantula may be found in northern South American rainforests such as Venezuela, northern Brazil, Guyana, French Guiana, and Suriname.

Color

  • The hue ranges from russet brown to black, and the third and fourth pairs of legs have unique spines.
  • Because the tarantula’s fangs fold beneath its body, it must hit its victim downwards to impale it.

Wingspan

  • These spiders may reach 30 cm (12 in) in limb spread, 13 cm (5.1 in) in body length and weigh up to 175 g. (6.2 oz.).
  • They are one of the few tarantula species without tibial spurs, which are found on most adult males’ first set of legs. They are generally golden-hued and tan to light brown.

Lifespan

In wild

  • Males live between 3 and 6 years, while females can live up to 20 years.

In Captivity

  • They are a nocturnal, terrestrial species that lives in marshy environments in deep burrows.
  • Females can live up to 25 years in captivity, while males live between 3 and 6 years.

Behavior & Temperament 

  • When threatened, it is one of the only tarantulas known to make a “hissing” sound.
  • They may be swift and aggressive, so this species isn’t the ideal choice for beginners trying to get their feet wet in the hobby.
  • It is one of the few tarantulas that makes a “hissing” sound when threatened.
  • This species isn’t the best choice for newbies looking to get their feet wet in the sport because they may be quick and aggressive.

History

  • Goliath Birdeater isn’t known for eating birds, although they are large enough to do it on occasion.
  • The term “Birdeater” comes from an illustration from the 18th century depicting another kind of tarantula eating a hummingbird, which gave the genus Theraphosa its name.

Habitat & Housing

  • The Goliath bird-eating tarantula may be found in northern South American rainforests such as Venezuela, northern Brazil, Guyana, French Guiana, and Suriname.
  • It may be found deep in the jungle, in silk-lined tunnels, and beneath rocks and roots.

Food & Diet

  • This species can consume birds and just about everything smaller than it, including insects and mice, frogs, lizards, and birds, as its name implies.
  • Cockroaches are eaten in the Smithsonian National Zoo.
  • Individuals of the Goliath bird-eating spider are usually solitary and only get together to mate.

Molting

  • Until your Goliath Birdeater grows, molting is rather common, with males dying off not long after attaining sexual maturity and females going on for years later, but at a much slower rate than before.
  • You don’t want to keep your Birdeater wet, especially during a molt, since this can lead to a variety of problems and even death for your tarantula.

Reproduction & Breeding

  • Males die within a few months of mating. To breed, the female must have recently molted, otherwise acquired sperm will be lost during the molt.
  • After mating, the female spins a web in which she deposits 50 to 200 fertilized eggs that travel through her body.

Predator

  • Predators include spider wasps, certain snakes, and other tarantulas in the wild.
  • Smaller insects can benefit from a tarantula that has recently molted.

Bites

Goliath Birdeater Bite
Goliath Birdeater Bite
  • The venom of the Goliath Birdeater is dangerous to tiny creatures, but not to humans.
  • The sting would be comparable to that of a wasp’s.
  • The urticating’s hairs of the enormous spider are meticulously singed away before the spider is cooked in banana leaves in various regions of South America.

Communication

  • They rub their hairs together to make a hissing noise loud enough to be heard 15 feet away if they need to protect themselves.
  • They may even loosen their hair and toss it at assailants.
  • As a supplementary protection technique, the goliath bird-eating spider may rear up on its hind legs and display its huge fangs.

Population

It is not known to us right now. 

As a Pet 

  • The proper individual can have a Goliath Birdeater as a pet, although it is not suggested for beginners.
  • Because this spider’s greatest size is so vast, it requires a significantly larger environment and has longer fangs than other tarantula species.
  • If you’re thinking of getting this species as a pet, do your study first!

Relation to Human

  • The venom of the Goliath is dangerous to tiny creatures, but not to humans. The sting would be comparable to that of a spider’s.
  • The urticating’s hairs of the enormous spider are meticulously singed away before the spider is cooked in banana leaves in various regions of South America.
  • Despite these little risks, goliath Birdeater plays a variety of roles in human culture.
  • After roasting the tarantulas, several tribes in South America consume them, and they are believed to have a delicious, shrimp-like flavor! Goliath Birdeater is popular among insect and reptile hobbyists.
  • Female Goliath Birdeater may live up to 25 years, which means you shouldn’t acquire one carelessly!

Giant Insect

  • While the Goliath Birdeater is the world’s largest tarantula, it is little in comparison to some of the insects of the past.
  • In fact, the Goliath Birdeater is a fraction of the size of some of the ancient spiders we’ve discovered!
  • Insects currently live in an environment that is vastly different from that of millions of years ago.
  • Arthropods evolved legs and left the water long before vertebrates did. As a result, they spent millions of years conquering the country.
  • Some of them developed to enormous proportions during this period, including dragonflies with a wingspan of about 3 feet that existed nearly 300 million years ago!

Defense Mechanism

These spiders’ defense mechanisms may be detrimental to humans, but they aren’t nearly as lethal as some of the world’s other poisonous spiders. They may protect themselves in three ways:

  • They make a specific sound by rubbing their setae (hairs) against one other. Stridulating is the term for the process of scaring away opponents.
  • They brush their rear legs on their stomachs to release more hairs that irritate the skin.
  • They bite with fangs that contain a little amount of venom.

 Fun Facts

  • When you think about huge siders, the word “tarantula” certainly comes to mind. This is not the name of a specific spider species, but rather the name of a collection of spider families.
  • They are a category of spiders that includes some of the world’s largest siders, and one of the most astounding Goliath Birdeater facts is that they are the largest of all!
  • These enormous spiders are only found in the rainforests of northern South America.
  • These spiders are carnivorous, which means they are predators who hunt a variety of tiny animals. Even though their name indicates that they eat birds, they don’t usually do so.
  • If you’re an arachnophobe, one of the things that terrify you about these terrifying sidekicks is their hair. Despite their appearance as hairs, they are actually “setae,” a bristle-like structure seen on many tarantulas.

Goliath Birdeater-FAQ

What is the biggest spider in the world?

It is the world’s largest spider.

How big is the biggest spider in the world?

According to Guinness World Records, the South American Goliath birdeater (Theraphosa blondi) is the world’s biggest spider. It may grow up to one foot (30 cm) in length and weigh up to 6 ounces (170 grams).

Where do the biggest spiders Live in the world?

The world’s largest spider is the giant huntsman spider, which has a leg span of 12 inches. To catch its victim, it does not weave a spiderweb. Instead, it stalks its target. While huntsman spiders may be found all over the world, the enormous huntsman arthropod exclusively dwells in caverns in Laos.

Do Humans Molt?

Humans, on the other hand, molt. Hair and skin cells are lost. That is molting in the technical sense. The loss of feathers, hairs, horns, nails, shells, and skins – any outer covering – is referred to as “molting.”

What happens if a Goliath Biredeator bites you?

The venom of the Goliath is dangerous to tiny creatures, but not to humans. The sting would be comparable to that of a wasp’s. The urticating hairs of the enormous spider are meticulously singed away before the spider is cooked in banana leaves in various regions of South America.